Word A Day – RAKE

13 06 2008

rake \reyk\

noun:

An agricultural implement with teeth or tines for gathering cut grass, hay, or the like or for smoothing the surface of the ground.
Any of various implements having a similar form, as a croupier’s implement for gathering in money on a gaming table.

verb:
To gather, draw, or remove with a rake
To clear, smooth, or prepare with a rake
To clear (a fire, embers, etc.) by stirring with a poker or the like.
To gather or collect abundantly (usually fol. by in)

Yeah, yeah, you know the word rake. It’s a thing; it’s an action. So by now, you’re trying to figure out why I chose this word as a Word A Day selection.

Well, here’s a meaning I don’t think you were too aware of.

rake \reyk\

noun:
A dissolute or profligate person, esp. a man who is licentious; roué.

Origin: rakehell

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This video posted on Kinetik’s facebook prompted this word entry.

Increasing our vocabulary one day at a time.





Word A Day – CAJOLE

12 06 2008

cajole \kuh-JOHL\

transitive:
To persuade with flattery, repeated appeals, or soothing words; to coax.

Cajole derives from Early Modern French cajoler, originally, “to chatter like a bird in a cage, to sing; hence, to amuse with idle talk, to flatter,” from Old French gaiole, jaiole, “a cage,” from Medieval Latin caveola, “a small cage,” from Latin cavea, “an enclosure, a den for animals, a bird cage,” from cavus, “hollow.” It is related to cave, cage and jail (British gaol).

Increasing our vocabulary one day at a time.





Word A Day – QUAGMIRE

11 06 2008

quagmire \KWAG-myr; KWOG-\

noun:
1. Soft, wet, miry land that shakes or yields under the feet.
2. A difficult or precarious position or situation; a predicament.

Quagmire is from quag, a dialectical variant of quake (from Old English cwacian) + mire, from Old Norse myrr, “a swamp.”

Increasing our vocabulary one day at a time.

Giggity.

Glenn Quagmire





Word A Day – CONGERIES

10 06 2008

congeries \KON-juh-reez\

noun:
A collection; an aggregation.

Congeries is from Latin congeries, “a heap, a mass,” from congerere, “to carry together, to bring together, to collect,” from com-, “with, together” + gerere, “to carry.” It is related to congest, “to overfill or overcrowd,” which derives from the past participle of congerere.

Increasing our vocabulary one day at a time.





Word A Day – LARGESS

9 06 2008

largess \lar-ZHES; lar-JES; LAR-jes\

noun:
1. Generous giving (as of gifts or money), often accompanied by condescension.
2. Gifts, money, or other valuables so given.
3. Generosity; liberality.

Largess is from Old French largesse, “largeness, generosity,” from large, from Latin largus, “plentiful, generous.”

Increasing our vocabulary one word at a time.





Word A Day – INTRANSIGENT

8 06 2008

intransigent \in-TRAN-suh-juhnt; -zuh-\

adjective

Refusing to compromise; uncompromising.

Intransigent is from French intransigeant, from Spanish intransigente, from in-, “not” (from Latin) + transigente, present participle of transigir, “to compromise,” from Latin transigere, “to come to an agreement,” from trans-, “across” + agere, “to drive.”

Increasing our vocabulary one word at a time.





Word A Day – MIASMA

7 06 2008

miasma \my-AZ-muh; mee-\

noun:
1. A vaporous exhalation (as of marshes or putrid matter) formerly thought to cause disease; broadly, a thick vaporous atmosphere or emanation.
2. A harmful or corrupting atmosphere or influence; also, an atmosphere that obscures; a fog.

Miasma comes from Greek miasma, “pollution,” from miainein, “to pollute.”

As in the Butler University campus.